• Antique Dealers
  • Hong Kong, el paraíso del contrabando de antigüedades… que China quiere aprovechar

    Una mujer observa varias antigüedades en una vitrina durante la feria Fine Arts Asia

    PEKÍN PONE FRENO A LOS CAZATESOROS https://www.elconfidencial.com/mundo/2017-10-30/hong-kong-paraiso-contrabando-antiguedades_1466468/ Rodeado de esculturas de feroces dioses budistas, mercaderes de la ruta de la Seda y voluptuosas cortesanas de la dinastía Tang, el propietario de uno de los numerosos anticuarios de Hollywood Road, una de las calles más antiguas de Hong Kong, enseña con orgullo su colección. “La mayoría de piezas […]

  • Antique Dealers
  • The rise and fall of Hong Kong’s Hollywood road – Part 1 of 3: The Rise

    NARRATIVE
OF THE
VOYAGES AND SERVICES
OF
THE NEMESIS
FROM 1840 TO 1843,

    Hong Kong’s famous “antique street” Hollywood Road, was completed in 1844 and was the 2nd road to be built in Hong Kong, after Queens Road Central. These were the very earliest days of the colony, and its role as gateway to the east was only just starting to become established. At that time, Hollywood Road was quite close to the coastline (significantly more so than today, due to reclamation of the harbor) and its near proximity to the shoreline, meant the area was never short of foreign merchants and sailors on their way back to Europe.

  • Fakes and Copies
  • Jiboazhai: China’s fake antiques museum

    Chinese museum forced to close after discovery its 40,000 piece collection of 'ancient relics' are fake

    Fakes are nothing new in China. From fake Apple stores & fake Ikea stores to fake rice made from plastic and even fake cities, almost everyday there is something new in China that is being faked, including & especially antiques. So it’s no surprise that there are also museums which are filled with fakes as well. China’s Jiboazhai Museum […]

  • Antique Restorations
  • Chai Kai – the art of structural repairs

    disassembled-antique-chinese-table-parts-spread-out-slide

    拆开 (Chāi kāi) essentially means to “take apart” and people often don’t realize that when you restore a piece of Chinese antique furniture, usually in addition to carefully cleaning it, it also usually must be taken apart and entirely refitted back together. Since Chinese furniture rarely uses nails, and instead uses a complex system of pegs and joints, the item can be completely disassembled, with the pieces spread out over the workshop floor.