• Business in China
  • Buying from China – The customer is NOT always right.

    You want white – they want black – and with a lot of pulling and tugging hopefully you’ll get gray. But is it really that simple? Does it really all boil down to just communication issues? Sometimes the buyer is just as much at fault for this situation as is the seller.

  • Fakes and Copies
  • Guide to buying Chinese Antiques on eBay

    The Brutal Truth about Buying Chinese Antiques on eBay This is a great little guide from an ebay seller who goes by the screen name of  loveshackbaybee. Its fairly comprehensive and worth a reprint here. Well written, very candid and overall good advice for the masses looking to pick up that “authentic Qing Dynasty vase […]

  • Chinese Furniture
  • Comparing apples to oranges – more on determining quality in Chinese antique furniture

    Photos of these two cabinets have been floating around on our file server for quite a while and I have been meaning to put them up here as another excellent example of differences in quality between Chinese antique workshops and restoration as well as in Chinese Country Antique Furniture in general. These are both essentially […]

  • Fakes and Copies
  • Do you know what you are selling? Because your customer might not.

    I am noticing a trend where just about “everyone and anyone” is now selling so called “Chinese antique furniture” (or some variation of this) and misrepresenting it as any number of different things. Items made just yesterday (antique reproductions) are falsely labeled as genuine antiques and the real antiques are often completely misclassified. I recently […]

  • Antique Reproductions
  • The problem of “Chaobuduo” (and how it effects reproduction furnitures)

    Chinese workers love to use the phrase ¨cha bu duo¨ 差不多 (pronounced “Cha Boo Daul) which directly translates to ¨not very far off  (meaning approximately or roughly)¨ Unfortunately, in almost all case it usually works out to be not even close,  in otherwords,  “cha tai duo”  (meaning way too far off).   Workers see no need for exact […]