Qianlong vase initially valued at $1300 sets record price of $69 million at auction

Its been happening so frequently that these headlines are almost starting to become old news. Still, it does make you want to go poking around in your grandmothers attic…

chinese vase sets record price 300x212 Qianlong vase initially valued at $1300 sets record price of $69 million at auction

Credit: Reuters/Bainbridges

Neglected Family Vase Sets 66 million Record for Chinese Art at Auction

Apparently the  18th-century  Qianlong-era porcelain vase was discovered while cleaning out a modest London suburb home. Other then knowing it was acquired in the 193o’s, the anonymous family who owned it knows little else as to its origins. According to the auctioneer Bainbridges, the vase itself dates from the  Qianlong period (1740′s) and would have  most definitely been fired in the imperial kilns before finally residing in the Chinese Royal Palace. According to the Antiques Trade Gazette, Bainbridges is a small suburban auction house which normally deals with cheaper antiques, equipment and lawnmowers.  Not bad, considering they stand to reap a 13.8 million dollar buyers premium from the sale. Purchased by a Chinese bidder on behalf of an undisclosed buyer, the sale price was not only more than 40 times the pre-sale estimate, but it set a new record for a Chinese work of art. But wait – it gets better.  “About 30 years ago it was shown on a television show called Going For A Song where an expert appraised it at $1300 as a “very good copy.” Poor guy – I definitely would not want to be him right about now.

Regardless of whatever price was paid, the real or fake, the vase really is absolutely stunning. Beautiful!

The downside? A tax bill totalling a few million.

Read more on the web:

The 47,000 USD dollar tooth brush holder – Chinese porcelain brush pot in owners bathroom sells at auction for staggering sum.

Here’s a great tidbit from the Dailyrecord:  China pot which owner used as toothbrush holder sells for £30k at auction. Quick – everyone run into their bathrooms right now to see what you got in there! I have a pristine tube of Crest toothpaste which I have been holding onto for years – definitely going to have it appraised!

An antique Chinese pot sold at auction for £30,000 (47,000 USD) was used for years by its owner as a toothbrush holder! Gordon Murray didn’t think the ceramic writing brush holder was worth much and reckoned he’d be lucky to get £400 for it. So he was left stunned when it fetched the princely sum at auction in Edinburgh.

Gordon, who runs Atholl Antiques in Aberdeen, cleaned up the pot for it to go under the hammer at Lyon and Turnbull on Wednesday. He said he began collecting antiques as a boy in Aberdeen in the 50s and his passion continued to grow.

He said: “On Saturdays I’d head off into the antique shops in town, including Young’s in Belmont Street and Alec “Cocky” Hunter’s in Castlegate, where I would buy what my meagre pocket money could afford.”

One thing for sure is there are definitely hidden gems out there waiting to be found! Here’s another one from the Dailymail from about the same time: Antique Chinese bowl valued at just £600 by auctioneers fetches £38,000… after bidding war breaks out among buyers.

Kanxi blue and white porcelain bowl 150x150 The 47,000 USD dollar tooth brush holder   Chinese porcelain brush pot in owners bathroom sells at auction for staggering sum.

Have you got one of these in your attic?

This antique Chinese bowl, which had a guide price £600, sold for more than £38,000 (60,000 USD) at auction yesterday.

The blue and white porcelain pot, which is believed to be a 19th century copy of one made in the Kangxi dynasty of 1662 to 1722, was bought by a Chinese man who lives in Britain.

Unassuming lot 379, which is eight inches wide and depicts a man ploughing a paddy field with water buffalo, attracted a surge of interest from its homeland after the auction catalogue was put on the internet.

Auctioneer Steven Moore, of Anderson & Garland, Newcastle, said: ‘I wasn’t surprised by the price, as I knew the amount of interest it had generated.

‘Chinese people are trying to find and collect their heritage.

A Chinese man living in the UK bid the highest price at this week’s auction.

Mr Moore added: ‘There is the possibilty that people have these things or things similar to this sat in their house and it is very possible that they are also worth this amount of money.

‘This is definitely the best time to sell Chinese porcelain.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1310188/Antique-Chinese-bowl-valued-just-600-fetches-staggering-38-000-auction.html#ixzz11YAvdWzG

Detecting Fake Chinese Porcelain & Ceramics

badmark1 230x300 Detecting Fake Chinese Porcelain & Ceramics

I am always a fan of people who dig into a subject, taking the time to take photos, make illustrations and simply dig in to the nitty-gritty details. People often forget that it takes time to take the time to share their own thoughts and insights on topics they are passionate about. So I was excited when “JP” at earlyming.com was kind enough to allow me to share his writings (below)  on collecting antique Chinese porcelain.

It’s been some time now since I’ve made any additions to my collection. There are several reasons. The first being that authentic Ming and Qing porcelains of value are quite rare and difficult to find. The second reason is that the online supply of such is totally out of control. I am speaking mainly of e`Bay. I like e`Bay, and in the early days (1998) there was an occasional bargain to be found.

Comparing the early trading days of 1998 to the present, I see many changes. Back in 1998 you could search for the exact phrase “Ming Dynasty” and come up with about 15 or 20 items. Of those, possibly one or two might be authentic. Statements of authenticity were carefully phrased with sellers wanting to build a good reputation. The e`Bay picture for Chinese porcelain quickly started to change.

Doing that same search on e`Bay  today now returns about 300 items. Most are guaranteed to be authentic Ming Dynasty. The sellers are now international, many from China. The Chinese authorities would not allow national treasures that belong in their museums to be sold for pennies to outsiders. The Chinese are not foolish. Of the many wise sayings Confucius came up with, he’d have smiled at the famous P.T. Barnum saying that there is a customer born every minute. Time of course has replaced the quoted word customer with the word sucker.  I bowed out of e`Bay’s Chinese porcelain trading years ago and have only recently returned with a renewed interest. I’m working on the detection of  fakes.

Early in 1999 I reported a certain seller, user  thesaurusfinearts, to e`Bay as being very dishonest in their claims, thinking they would look into the matter. Nothing happened.   They instead allowed them to continue trading for another 4 years. In 2003 I got the following message when checking the username:

This seller is not currently offering any items for sale

Hmmm… I wonder why. Here’s why.

The US Government finally stepped in and closed down the dealer, Thesaurus Fine Arts of Seattle. Their claims of guaranteed thermoluminescence testing were finally challenged by an investigative reporter. Oxford’s Authentication Laboratory of England and Daybreak Archaeometric Laboratory of the US, both world leaders in the field, verified the fraudulent test results. Charges of fraud have been filed causing Thesaurus Fine Arts of Seattle to close down their operation. Click here to view that article.

In the Reference section of this site, under the heading of Buyer Beware, I point out one of the tactics to look out for in online auctions, the private auction. This particular seller quickly converted to the private auction early on. At one point I tallied up the asking price of the 50 some items they were offering that week alone. It came to $250,000.00. So why did e`Bay allow trading to continue for so many years in opposition of the many complaints I know they received?

Though the sales were few and far between, they must have received a nice commission on some of the 162 transactions listed, 88 from unique users.

I still like e`Bay, but only hope that they will now establish guidelines to protect the buyers instead of ignoring complaints, and turning a blind eye until the US Government has to step in.

Continuing on now with the detection of fakes,  I’ve chosen these particular pieces as they have the appearance of genuine Ming blue and white.  In some cases they almost mirror what you would see in a Christies or Sotheby’s catalogue.

Read the rest of this entry »

Where can I find detailed information on Chinese porcelain, pottery and ceramics?

(This is a section from a previous post which I think is worth separating out here, since I am asked this question quite a lot).

Where can I find more detailed information on Chinese porcelain, pottery and ceramics?

Chinese porcelain, Oriental ceramics and Japanese porcelain and pottery are all unique entire subjects of their own and it would be impossible to cover even just a fraction of the material available here today. Rather then attempt to do so, I will suggest a few quality resources,

The website of Koh Antique in Singapore, has one of the most comprehensive sources of information on Chinese porcelain and ceramics, all meticulously described and cataloged in an easy to read format.

This is the most comprehensive source of information on Qianjiang porcelain on the internet.  Besides giving a brief history, more than 350 pieces of Qianjiang porcelains have been cataloged.   The pieces are displayed based on chronological order and also by artist.  

Topics covered, range from “Symbolism on Chinese Ceramics,” to more specific information on time periods and individual styles such as Ming Blue and white, Celadon waresQingbai, Shufu, Ding and Cizhou wares. Particularly useful is his dictionary of Chinese symbolism and motifs used in ceramics.

koh antiques porcelain ceramics.thumbnail Where can I find detailed information on Chinese porcelain, pottery and ceramics?

 Also invaluable for anyone wanting to understand the progression of styles between the various periods, is their Chart (available here) showing the development over time of the different Chinese porcelain types.

The other site most commonly cited on this topic is Gotheborg in Sweden, run by Jan-Erik Nilsson. The “Marks on Chinese Porcelain” page is probably the first stop for anyone trying to identify a piece.

gotheborg chinese porcelain.thumbnail Where can I find detailed information on Chinese porcelain, pottery and ceramics?

The other two really major resources here are the “Antique Chinese and Japanese Pottery and Porcelain Discussion Board” and the links list which is very, very extensive.

Authentic antique Chinese porcelain wares, pottery and oriental ceramics.

I recently was looked over a friends personal collection of Chinese porcelain wares, which I have been meaning to post photos and descriptions of here for quite some time. For now, I have included a slide show below which pulls the images from ACF’s page on Flickr.


Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR.

The hi-resolution images can be viewed on our Flickr page.

At some point, I will get back and add in proper descriptions for what these pieces are. Needless to say, the majority of these items are not reproductions, and whether or not these antiques can be exported is a separate question altogether.

S6002690

 

2788546061 d3e4778e74 Authentic antique Chinese porcelain wares, pottery and oriental ceramics.

Tags: chinese, antique, porcelain, ceramics, kangxi, ming, qing, China, Beijing, expert, chinaware, LYL
Uploaded: August 23, 2008
View this photo on Flickr

2789398030 5ac68469e3 s Authentic antique Chinese porcelain wares, pottery and oriental ceramics. Previous Photo 2788546163 6c8d858ffa s Authentic antique Chinese porcelain wares, pottery and oriental ceramics. Next Photo

Where can I find more detailed information on Chinese porcelain, pottery and ceramics?

Chinese porcelain, Oriental ceramics and Japanese porcelain and pottery are all unique entire subjects of their own and it would be impossible to cover even just a fraction of the material available here today. Rather then attempt to do so, I will suggest a few quality resources,

The website of Koh Antique in Singapore, has one of the most comprehensive sources of information on Chinese porcelain and ceramics, all meticulously described and cataloged in an easy to read format.

This is the most comprehensive source of information on Qianjiang porcelain on the internet.  Besides giving a brief history, more than 350 pieces of Qianjiang porcelains have been cataloged.   The pieces are displayed based on chronological order and also by artist.  

Read the rest of this entry »

The specialists guide to Chinese antiques is Stephen Fry proof thanks to caching by WP Super Cache